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Displaying items by tag: Asian Art

Sotheby’s will offer a selection of exceptional Japanese and Chinese works of art drawn from the collection of Japanese connoisseur Tsuneichi Inoue on May 13, alongside its biannual auction of Important Chinese Art.

“The Soul of Japanese Aesthetics: The Tsuneichi Inoue Collection” offers a revealing cross section of prevailing aesthetic tastes in Tokyo during the early to mid-20th century. Classical Ming and Song Dynasty porcelain and ceramics were very much in vogue, along with archaic Chinese bronzes.

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe has announced a $1 million gift to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, the Smithsonian Asian art museums, to support their ongoing work to promote his country’s art and culture.

The gift was announced during a dinner Wednesday at the Freer that was part of the Japanese leader’s official visit to Washington.

“I would like to express my appreciation to the Freer Gallery of Art for its dedication to Japanese art but also for giving us such a wonderful venue to promote people-to-people exchanges between Japan and the United States,” Abe said.

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Japanese prints were last shown as a group at the MFA during the 40th anniversary year in 2005, and the majority of the more than 40 works in this new exhibition are on view for the first time. One of the world’s great artistic traditions, Japanese prints are known for their technical accomplishment, superlative design, and sheer beauty.

"Images of the Floating World and Beyond: Japanese Woodblock Prints" extends from the late eighteenth century to an example from the twenty-first. The exhibition opens Saturday, May 9, and continues through Sunday, August 16. Director Emeritus Dr. John E. Schloder has curated the show with Stephanie Chill, M.A. He will introduce the works in a lecture on opening day at 3 p.m.

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They seem to breathe, these 12 20th-century African masks, and to look at us with the same bold curiosity with which we examine them.

A few have birds nesting in their wooden and metal hair. Two others rise above long tangles of raffia. One artist even etched a pair of spectacles onto her mask.

Despite the charming touches, the masks are undeniably powerful and even frightening.

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Wednesday, 01 April 2015 12:40

Asia Week New York Sees Record-Breaking Sales

The 2015 edition of Asia Week New York ended its nine-day Asian art extravaganza with record-shattering sales totaling $360M, almost doubling last year’s number with an 80% increase of $160M.
 
Said Carol Conover, chairman of Asia Week New York: “By all accounts, we have succeeded in making New York the destination for buying Asian art, not only for many of the great museums in the United States and abroad, but also for the leading international private collectors. Galleries saw steady and heavy traffic throughout the week, and sales for the four major auction houses reached new highs, making it a great success in terms of revenue in all areas across the board. With the influx of new buyers from China who came here for the sale of The Robert Hatfield Ellsworth Collection at Christies, the exuberance and excitement of the week was palpable.”
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On March 17, Christie’s hosted its first-ever evening sale dedicated to Asian art in New York. The occasion was the first offering from the prized Robert Hatfield Ellsworth Collection, regarded as the most prestigious — not to mention largest — private collection of Asian art to hit the auction block. Thanks to the freshness of the material and the pedigreed provenance, the house had no trouble securing buyers for all 57 lots, and with a whopping $61,107,500, total, the results demonstrated strength across all areas of the market for Indian, Himalayan, Southeast Asian, Chinese, and Japanese art.

The sale began promptly at 6 p.m., with fierce participation from telephone bidders and individuals in the room for a superb gilt-bronze figure of a seated bear from China’s Western Han Dynasty (206 BC).

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One of the world’s finest collections of Japanese cloisonné enamels went on display at the Chester Beatty Library, Dublin on March 14, 2015. The collection, on loan from the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, provides an insight into one of Japan’s most exquisite art forms. "Seven Treasures: Japanese Cloisonné Enamels from the Victoria and Albert Museum," London is free to the public and continues at the Library until June 14, 2015.

Cloisonné enamels were among Japan’s most successful exports in the late 19th century, reaching a peak of artistic and technological sophistication between 1880 and 1910, a period referred to as the ‘Golden Age’. This exhibition showcases over one hundred enamels, almost 90 of which were donated from the collection of Mr Edwin Davies CBE, with the others from the V&A’s historical collection which dates from the Paris International Exposition of 1867.

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She lived much of her life in New York City luxury, but Mary Griggs Burke never forgot her Minnesota roots.

Museums around the world courted her, hoping she would bequeath to them her legendary collection of Japanese art, but it was to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts that she left the bulk of it: 700 pieces of rare Japanese and Korean art, spanning 5,000 years, along with a $12.5 million endowment.

The bequest from Burke, announced Monday, catapults the Minneapolis museum’s Japanese collection into the top tier of U.S. museums.

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Of all the billionaires that come and go on the Forbes China Rich List, Liu Yiqian is certainly the one with the biggest appetite for art. Liu, who ranked No. 220 with a net worth of $ 1 billion, yesterday bought a 600-year-old imperial embroidered Tibetan tapestry at a Christie’s auction for $ 348 million Hong Kong dollars ($45 million), setting a record for any Chinese works of art sold by an international auction house.

For the art-savvy Liu, the magnificent piece is too important to miss. The silk tapestry, known as a thangka, is more than three meters tall and two meters wide.

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Thursday, 12 March 2015 11:35

Museum Curators Converge for Asia Week New York

More than 100 Asian art curators from premier museums world-wide will make their annual expedition to Asia Week New York for an unprecedented nine-day extravaganza of 42 specially-curated shows by gallerists from around the globe, 25 auction sales and numerous museum exhibitions and special events all over Manhattan and the metropolitan area.
 
Says Carol Conover, chairman of Asia Week New York: “We are delighted to once again welcome a distinguished contingent of Asian art curators, whose enthusiasm and scholarship  are testaments to the importance of Asia Week New York as a not-to-be-missed destination for museums.”
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