Reflecting Changes in Taste and Fashion: Tankards and Teapots from the Glen-Sanders Collection

Two pear-shaped teapots. Left: Marked “IB”, unidentified; Right: unmarked. New York, or Albany, N.Y., 1740–1760. Silver, wood. The Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg. Museum Purchase (1964-274 and 1964-275). Two pear-shaped teapots. Left: Marked “IB”, unidentified; Right: unmarked. New York, or Albany, N.Y., 1740–1760. Silver, wood. The Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg. Museum Purchase (1964-274 and 1964-275).

From great-grandmother’s quilt to George Washington’s watch seal, we venerate things from bygone days as tangible links to our personal and national histories. Among the varied artifacts from earlier generations, silver is particularly potent in recording lives lived long ago. Silver items often were marked by the master of the shop in which they were made, and receipts of payment occasionally survive for these costly items.

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