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Displaying items by tag: Curator

Gabriele Finaldi has been appointed the new head of the National Gallery, replacing Nicholas Penny who announced his retirement last year.

The 49-year-old is currently deputy director for collections and research at the Prado museum in Madrid.

Finaldi was a curator at the National from 1992 to 2002, where he was responsible for the later paintings in the Italian and Spanish collections.

He said he was "deeply honored" to take on the directorship.

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For most people, Canaletto is the artist who depicted Venice – the painter of some of the best known and most beautiful views of his home city. But for nearly ten years he was an adopted English artist chronicling a society which, unlike Venice, was changing at an unimaginable pace.

A new exhibition opening to the public on Saturday will for the first time bring together paintings Canaletto produced in Britain. Unlike previous shows, it will examine his stay between 1746 and 1755 in a social as well as an art history context.

“He is painting a new, vibrant and confident Britain,” said the show’s curator, Steven Parissien. “Things are looking good in Britain and it often takes an outsider to see it.

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Contrary to popular opinion, James Abbott McNeill Whistler's famous 1871 painting "Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1," better known as "Portrait of the Artist's Mother," is not a harsh and puritanical portrayal of a matriarch. It's a homage to the rich and tender relationship shared by a mother and her loving son, says Norton Simon Museum associate curator Emily Beeny.

The painting, made in London while the artist's mother, Anna, was living with him at Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, was the last Whistler would submit to the Royal Academy of Art.

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Stéphane Aquin holds a distinguished profile in the Canadian art world and abroad, in part because he arrived to the role of curator from art criticism, but also because, in an era of revolving doors and fast-tracked career-making, Aquin has stayed with one institution—the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA)—for a long stretch of time, putting his head down and achieving increasingly strong exhibitions. Over the course of 16 years, he has accomplished major solo exhibitions with the likes of Pipilotti Rist, Tom Wesselman, and, most recently, Peter Doig, what many consider (including Aquin) his crowning achievement at the MMFA. In addition, he has curated interpretations of the Chapman brothers, Andy Warhol, and Alfred Hitchcock, and expanded the museum's collection by more than a thousand artworks, including works by David Altmejd, Kiki Smith, Antony Gormley, Dorion FitzGerald, and Michael Snow.

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Someone apparently unfamiliar with the term “Romantic art” asked a Yale curator if Yale’s big, new exhibition would be ready for Valentine’s Day.

That’s curator humor, delivered politely of course, during the Wednesday preview of this beefy show, the first joint exhibition by the Yale University Art Gallery and the Yale Center for British Art called, “The Critique of Reason: Romantic Art 1760-1860.”

Amy Meyers, director of the Yale Center for British Art, said artwork often has been lent from one side of Chapel Street to the other in past cooperation between the gallery and the Brit center, but never with the opportunity to bring the two collections together in this way, to examine this important period’s art in such context.

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With a $200,000 donation, the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation will be the lead foundation donor for the US pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale.

Last week, curator Okwui Enwezor announced the 136 artists and collectives included in the “All the World's Futures," the Biennale's main exhibition.

The gift was announced by the MIT List Visual Arts Center, the organizer of the US pavilion, which will feature an immersive multimedia installation from veteran video and performance artist Joan Jonas, inspired by the work of writer Halldór Laxness as well as other literary sources.

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A sweeping reinstallation of The Museum of Modern Art’s contemporary collection presents a wide range of artistic approaches to the political, social, and cultural flux that have shaped the current global landscape. "Scenes for a New Heritage: Contemporary Art from the Collection," on view from March 8, 2015, through March 2016, features video, installation, sculpture, drawing, prints, and photography created in the past three decades by more than 30 international artists, with more than half of the works on view for the first time. "Scenes for a New Heritage" is organized by Quentin Bajac, the Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography; Eva Respini, Curator, Department of Photography; Ana Janevski, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art; and Sarah Suzuki, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints; with Katerina Stathopoulou, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Photography.

The last 30 years have seen remarkable societal and cultural change, as major shifts in geopolitical dynamics destabilized the established world order, new economies emerged to challenge those long dominant, and the Internet radically altered the ways in which we access and generate information.

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“The Plains Indians: Artists of the Earth and Sky,” one of the greatest exhibitions of American Indian art you may ever see, opened Monday at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The show was originated by the Musée du Quai Branly in Paris and the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (where I saw it) in Kansas City, Mo., and organized by the inestimable Gaylord Torrence, the Nelson-Atkins’s curator in the field and also the orchestrator of its acclaimed permanent collection galleries.

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Most of us think of the High Line as something of a weird, wonderful urban park. But Cecilia Alemani, the curator and director of High Line Art, hastens to correct us, because it is so much more: “The High Line is both a promenade and an observatory: a place removed only 30 feet from the hustle of Manhattan streets, yet with this small distance the park allows its visitors space for respite and reflection,” she said. On Friday morning, High Line Art announced its newest open-air exhibition "Panorama," an art installation meant to bring together “humankind and nature” and entice viewers to reflect on their relationship to the outdoors.

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Thomas Kren, the associate director for collections at the J. Paul Getty Museum, will retire after more than 35 years, the museum announced Thursday.

When Kren leaves the Getty in October, Richard Rand, senior curator of paintings and sculpture at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Mass., will replace him. Rand began his career at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1989.

Kren arrived at the Getty in 1980 as the associate curator of paintings. In 1984 he became the first senior curator of manuscripts, a position he held until 2010, when he took on his current role.

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