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Displaying items by tag: Exhibition

Bright abstracts draw visitors' eyes to one wall, then life-like full sized figures tucked into a corner might startle them. On another wall, a full-sized truck is caught mid-slither. Such displays will continue to offer visual surprises during the Walker Art Center's 75th anniversary celebrations, especially tonight, when the center unwraps some birthday presents.

They are the fruits of an effort that began three years ago, when the Walker launched a campaign to seek donated art to mark the three-quarter-century milestone. Its new show, "75 Gifts for 75 years," gives insight into the importance donations play in a museum's collection.

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The National Arts Club presents a rare collection of work from Spanish surrealist, Salvador Dali. The month-long free exhibition, entitled "Dali: The Golden Years," celebrated its opening with a reception on Wednesday February 4th between 6pm - 8pm to which the general public was invited.

The exhibition will show 65 pieces in total, including early works that have never been shown before on loan from private collectors. Early drawings and prints make up three full collections including; "The Les Chants Maldoror" (1934), "12 Tribes of Israel" (1971), and "Memories of Surrealism" (1973). Each marks a major graphic series in Dali's career, while four never-before-seen pieces and an iconic photo of the artist himself by Anton Perich provide invaluable insight into Dali's creative process.

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The Turner Prize winning artist Sir Anish Kapoor is currently presenting an exhibition of recent work at Regen Projects in Los Angeles. As one of the most influential sculptors of his generation, Kapoor’s work combines the formal concerns of minimalism with concerns for the material and psychical nature of both the object and the self. Known primarily for his large site-specific installations and objects that test the phenomenology of space, this exhibition features significant new work that pushes his use of materials into exciting new territories. Kapoor has shown with Regen Projects since 1992 and this marks the artist’s fifth solo exhibition at the gallery.

A series of monumental works feature organic, terrestrial forms made from resin and earth.

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A sketch of Van Gogh has been discovered in an album of drawings by his friend, the French artist Emile Bernard (1868-1941). Other than self-portraits, there are very few depictions of Van Gogh, so this represents a remarkable find. It is being published for the first time by "The Art Newspaper" and will be unveiled during a coming exhibition at the Kunsthalle Bremen.

Bernard’s hasty sketch captures Van Gogh in a Parisian café, probably in Montmartre. He is drinking with two women, most likely prostitutes. Van Gogh has a short beard, moustache and slightly receding hair. Most noticeable are the piercing eyes. The sketch has spontaneity, suggesting that Bernard drew it while they were out for an evening.

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A recently opened exhibition at the Beaux-Arts Mons, in Belgium examines van Gogh's stay in the Borinage (a depressed coal mining region in southern Belgium) from 1878-1880, a pivotal time during which the artist abandoned his failed attempt at a preaching career and instead embraced drawing and painting.

In a letter written to his brother Theo, he expressed his longing to draw, and started by copying prints. Van Gogh, who felt a connection with the town's peasants and workers, began to focus on scenes from their everyday lives, themes that would continue throughout the duration of his short career.

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A recent study of the culture and indigenous groups of Colombia has revealed that the history of the country’s inhabitants is older and more diverse than was first described in historical documents. “Ancient Colombia: A Journey through the Cauca Valley” is an exhibition opening on January 31 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art that follows the footsteps of Pedro Cieza de Léon, one of the most important chroniclers of the Spanish conquistadors’ adventures in the Cauca River Valley, as he landed in 1533 in what is now known as Colombia.

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The Arkansas Arts Center, the state's premiere center for visual and performing arts, presents "30 Americans," on view April 10 through June 21, 2015, in the Jeannette Edris Rockefeller and Townsend Wolfe Galleries.

"This exhibition presents a sweeping survey of artwork by many of the most influential African-American artists of the last four decades," said Arkansas Arts Center executive director Todd Herman. "For years, I've searched for an exhibition of this kind but couldn't quite find what I was looking for – an exhibition with powerful interpretations of cultural identity and artistic legacy. When I came across '30 Americans,' I knew this was exactly what I wanted patrons and visitors of the Arts Center to experience. These themes are universal in nature and speak to the larger human experience."

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The Gemäldegalerie in Berlin and London's Victoria and Albert Museum have joined forces to present a comprehensive exhibition of works by the early Renaissance master Sandro Botticelli, "Monopol" reports.

Botticelli is not only regarded as one of the leading painters of the Italian Renaissance, but also as an icon of pop culture. The exhibition, thus, will pay tribute to the artist's enduring influence on art, design, and fashion, which can be traced to the present day.

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The Phillips Collection opened an exhibition of works by preeminent artist Jacob Lawrence. Produced between 1954 and 1956, "Struggle … From the History of the American People" portrays scenes from American history, chronicling events from the Revolutionary War through the great westward expansion of 1817. The Phillips is displaying 12 panels from the series, on loan from the Harvey and Harvey-Ann Ross collection, in "Jacob Lawrence: Struggle … From the History of the American People." The exhibition runs through August 9, 2015.

In 1954—a decade after completing his epic masterwork "The Migration Series"—Lawrence conceived of a new 60-panel series dedicated to telling the history of the American people.

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The British National Gallery’s exhibition “Inventing Impressionism” is the UK’s first exhibition devoted to visionary French art dealer and gallerist Paul Durand-Ruel (1831-1922) – the man who “invented” Impressionism.

Durand-Ruel is credited with the discovery of artists such as Monet, Pissarro, Degas, and Renoir who he supported morally and financially, buying and exhibiting their work at a time when it was being ridiculed and rejected.

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