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Displaying items by tag: Exhibition

Works by some of France’s most celebrated painters are featured in From the Collection: 300 Years of French Landscape Painting, a new exhibition that opened July 17 at the Toledo Museum of Art.

Curated by Lawrence W. Nichols, William Hutton senior curator of European and American painting and sculpture before 1900, this small, insightful show offers a chronological survey of the French approach to painting landscapes.

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In celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Color Charts inception, an exhibition of  Gerhard Richter's iconic paintings, selected from the artist’s original nineteen, 'Color Charts,' produced in 1966 is to be mounted at Dominique Lévy in London. Presented with the support of the Gerhard Richter Archive, the exhibition is the first exhibition to feature a small but vital group of works from this series since their inaugural appearance at Galerie Friedrich & Dahlem, Munich in 1966. The exhibition also includes a group of Color Charts painted in 1971, when Richter reexamined and expanded the series after a five-year hiatus.

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More than 480,000 people visited Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty at the V&A, making it the most visited paid-for exhibition at the Museum ever. The exhibition was the only major UK retrospective of the work of the visionary fashion designer Lee Alexander McQueen, widely celebrated as one of the most innovative designers of his generation. 

Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty was originally presented at the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in 2010. The exhibition has been open at the V&A since March 14, operating for more than 1,000 hours for public opening and private events.

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If you thought you knew everything there was to know about Andy Warhol, the undisputed high priest of Pop art, the exhibition “Warhol Underground” at the Centre Pompidou-Metz  might just change your mind.

“I never wanted to be a painter; I wanted to be a tap dancer” and “I don't paint any more, I gave it up about a year ago and just do movies now” are just two of the many statements made by Warhol in the 1960s that signified his ambitions beyond the pictorial field.

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A new exhibition at the Cloisters in Manhattan, "Treasures and Talismans: Rings From the Griffin Collection," put together by C. Griffith Mann, curator of the Department of Medieval Art and the Cloisters, explores the subtle meanings behind beloved pieces of jewelry.

A number of ancient and medieval rings, on long-term loan to the museum, are shown in a wider historical and cultural context in the exhibition. Displayed alongside the jewels is a curated selection of paintings and sculptures borrowed from the museum's Greek and Roman Art, European Paintings, and Robert Lehman Collection.

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As a teenager, Yves Henri Donat Mathieu-Saint-Laurent, born in 1936 in Algeria, was already designing “Paper Doll Couture House,” replete with miniature accessorized frocks and people-scaled programs on which his sisters, playing clients, would write their clothing selections.

“It’s like a rehearsal,” said Florence Müller, a fashion historian and independent Paris-based curator who will show the doll house for the first time in the United States at the Seattle Art Museum in fall 2016, as part of the exhibition “Yves Saint Laurent: The Perfection of Style.”

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He is one of the great draftsmen of the impressionist era, acclaimed for strongly structured compositions and a masterful use of line. But when Edgar Degas discovered the printmaking technique known as monotype, everything changed.

As a major exhibition due to open at the Museum of Modern Art next spring reveals, he became much looser and more improvisational in his working methods. He regularly mixed printmaking with other media, like pastel. And he expanded past the subjects for which he is best known—dancers and scenes of modern life—to include risqué brothel scenes and landscapes verging on abstraction.

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Extraordinary work by glass luminary Dale Chihuly is shown at Museum of Glass through January 4, 2016. Creating a vibrant display, the exhibition features Chihuly’s own contemporary versions of Italian Art Deco Venetian sculptures.

Chihuly’s Venetians were developed from the inspiration he acquired while making a trip to Venice in 1988. During this trip, he visited a gallery that housed an extraordinary private collection of Venetian glass that represented the pinnacle of Venetian Art Deco. Returning to the U.S., he then decided to create his own versions of the classic pieces with his unique, lively twist.

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“The American Spirit: Painting and Sculpture From the Santa Barbara Museum of Art" would be a good standalone exhibition but, lucky visitors, it's but one of two very fine ones now at the Tampa Museum of Art.

Several weeks ago, I reviewed "In Living Color: Andy Warhol and Contemporary Printmaking," also at the Tampa Museum, which by itself is worth the admission. While the word "bargain" isn't usually associated with museums, you're getting one, especially when you factor in the ever-present antiquities from the permanent collection.

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Tate Britain is to stage a “non-celebratory” exhibition devoted to art and the British Empire, taking a critical look at the nation’s colonial past.

The 200 works on display include paintings that were banished from national collections in the 1950s and 1960s, when they were considered an embarrassing reminder that Britain was no longer a great imperial power.

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