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Displaying items by tag: National Gallery of Art

Van Gogh’s sweeping depictions of nature, like a detailed study of a moth or a flower, the rain-soaked French countryside or sun-scorched wheat fields, preoccupied his work and his thinking throughout his career.

“I’ve been a van Gogh nut ever since I was a teenager,” said Richard Kendall, a curator at large at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Mass., who organized “Van Gogh’s Van Goghs: Masterpieces From the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam” at the National Gallery of Art in Washington in 1998.

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The Norton Simon Museum announces a special installation of Édouard Manet’s poetic "The Railway," 1873, a highlight from the National Gallery of Art’s esteemed 19th-century collection. Evident in this dramatic work are Manet’s characteristic brushwork, his brilliant use of color and sense of composition, and his striking portrayal of modern life—indeed, the scene is set near the bustling Gare Saint-Lazare. Its installation at the Norton Simon Museum marks the first time the painting has been on view on the West Coast. It will be installed in the Norton Simon’s Impressionist Art Wing from Dec. 5, 2014, through March 2, 2015.

"We are delighted to continue the exciting exchange program with the National Gallery of Art," says Museum President Walter W. Timoshuk. "This mesmerizing masterpiece, the fourth loan from the esteemed Washington institution, will, we hope, enchant our visitors during its three-month stay."

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The National Gallery of Art (NGA) is planning a major exhibition about the shifting relationship between America’s self-taught artists and its mainstream Modern and contemporary art. The show is being organized by the leading curator and scholar, Lynne Cooke, who in August became the national gallery’s senior curator of special projects in Modern art. She was the Andrew W. Mellon professor at the gallery’s Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (2012-14), which provided the opportunity to undertake the in-depth research for the exhibition and accompanying publication.

“It is not a survey,” she tells The Art Newspaper, “but it does embrace almost a century.” 

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On Friday, November 21, the National Gallery of Art’s Board of Trustees announced an impressive series of new acquisitions. From a collection of underground comic books to five sets of rare Venetian etchings, the recent additions to the museum’s collection are decidedly varied and unique. According to Earl A. Powell III, the director of the National Gallery, "These new acquisitions embody the innovation, continuity, and renewal that characterize art. The Gallery is very grateful for the continuing generosity of its donors and to the public for visiting us—from every corner of the globe—to view the treasures of our permanent collection."

The comic book collection was gifted to the museum by leading American art history scholars, Abigail and William Gerdts. The bequest marks the first time that comic books have been added to the National Gallery’s permanent collection.

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Transcendence comes cheap and easy at "Matisse and Friends," the new exhibit at the Denver Art Museum, and, for most of us, that's a terrific help. We're all busy, no?

The show has just 14 paintings, and you can tour through, meaningfully, in less than time than it takes to watch a rerun of "Law & Order." See it on your lunch hour, or while the kids are at ballet class. Make it a date and get to the romance without having to be all that charming in the buildup.

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Monday, 13 October 2014 12:36

Goya Retrospective Opens at Boston’s MFA

This fall, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, presents "Goya: Order and Disorder," a landmark exhibition dedicated to Spanish master Francisco Goya (1746–1828). The largest retrospective of the artist to take place in America in 25 years features 170 paintings, prints and drawings—offering the rare opportunity to examine Goya’s powers of observation and invention across the full range of his work. The MFA welcomes many loans from Europe and the US, including 21 works from the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid, along with loans from the Musée du Louvre, the Galleria degli Uffizi, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art (Washington) and private collections. "Goya: Order and Disorder" includes some 60 works from the MFA’s collection of Goya’s works on paper, one of the most important in the world. Many of these prints and drawings have not been on view in Boston in 25 years. Employed as a court painter by four successive rulers of Spain, Goya managed to explore an extraordinarily wide range of subjects, genres and formats. From the striking portrait "Duchess of Alba" (1797) from the Hispanic Society of America, to the tour de force of Goya’s "Seated Giant" (by 1818) in the MFA’s collection, to his drawings of lunacy, the works on view demonstrate the artist’s fluency across media.

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The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History will be inaugurated on October 29 with a gathering of prominent art historians and museum leadership from around the world. The Institute has been founded through a $17 million gift from longtime patron of the arts Edith O’Donnell to the University of Texas at Dallas, and will be one of the preeminent centers for art history research and training in the U.S., alongside the J. Paul Getty Museum; the Clark Art Institute; the Institute of Fine Arts at NYU; and the National Gallery of Art, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts.

Through its partnership with the Dallas Museum of Art, the Institute will be the first degree-granting program in the U.S. that incorporates both an institute and a museum, and is the first such program that is a collaboration between a public university and a public museum.

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The National Gallery of Art's "Little Dancer Aged Fourteen" (1878–1881) takes center stage in "Degas's Little Dancer," a focus exhibition on view through January 11, 2015. The exhibition is presented in conjunction with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts' world-premiere musical "Little Dancer," which runs from October 25, 2014 through November 30, 2014. The musical is inspired by Edgar Degas's renowned original wax statuette of a young ballerina, which caused a sensation when it was first shown at the 1881 impressionist exhibition in Paris and is one of the most popular works of art in the Gallery of Art's collection.

"Thanks to the generosity of Gallery benefactor Paul Mellon, the Gallery has the largest and most important collection of Degas's original wax sculptures, including the groundbreaking 'Little Dancer Aged Fourteen,' one of the best-loved sculptures of all time," said Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art.

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The hearse carried only a wreath, because technically, the dearly departed was still alive — albeit barely, considering the vegetative, life-supported state the Corcoran Gallery of Art has been in since August. When the institution’s takeover by the National Gallery of Art and George Washington University was approved last month, the spirit had already left the body. So on Saturday, the day before the museum was scheduled to close for renovations, from which it will later emerge as part of the National Gallery of Art, former staff members gathered there to mourn.

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Visitors to the Corcoran Gallery of Art have quadrupled since admission became free to the public late last month.

With the gallery scheduled to close soon for renovation, art lovers are coming to the gallery in its last month for all kinds of reasons.

After court approval of a controversial plan that ended the Corcoran's independence, the art gallery and its school have merged with the National Gallery of Art and George Washington University.

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