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Displaying items by tag: Pablo Picasso

When it comes to exploring Picasso, it would seem there is little left for curators to discover, despite his prodigious output. Right now, there are two major gallery exhibitions, at Gagosian and at Pace, as well as a show of Cubist works including Picasso from the Leonard Lauder collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

But what few people realize is that Picasso’s sculpture is still relatively uncharted territory. The last show devoted to it in this country took place in 1967 at the Museum of Modern Art. B

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One of Germany's best known art dealers has gone on trial on charges of defrauding the heirs to the Aldi supermarket empire of millions of euros.

Helge Achenbach is accused of falsifying accounts of artworks and classic cars he purchased on behalf of the Albrecht family, including paintings by Pablo Picasso and Roy Lichtenstein, and vintage Ferraris, Bentleys and Bugattis.

Prosecutors accuse Mr. Achenbach of more than 20 counts of fraud, as well as charges of forgery and breach of trust, in the trial in the western city of Essen, the court said in a statement. If found guilty, he faces up to ten years in prison.

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An unknown thief or group of thieves stole Pablo Picasso's "Visage aux Mains (Face with Hands)" (1956) from the Amsterdam-based Leslie Smith Gallery's booth at Art Miami, the "Miami Herald" reports. The work is a 16.5 inch in diameter silver plate and is believed to have been snatched sometime after 10:30pm on Thursday night. Police have classified the heist as grand theft.

Gallery owner David Smith discovered that the plate was missing from its holder upon arriving to Art Miami on Friday morning around 10:45am.

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If Pablo Picasso was famous for anything outside his ground-breaking artwork, it was for his insatiable appetite for the opposite sex.

Picasso loved women. His wives, his mistresses, his girlfriends and random liaisons inspired not only his libido, but also his art — and led to one of the largest bodies of work of any artist in history.

The Norton Museum of Art is celebrating the women who inspired the master artist.

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The Norton Museum of Art presents "Master Prints: Dürer to Matisse," featuring astonishing works on paper including woodcuts, etchings, engravings, aquatints, and lithographs that range from the 15th to 20th centuries. This not-to-be-missed exhibition brings together several of the earliest as well as later examples of the golden age of printmaking. Works by old masters Dürer, Rembrandt, Goya, and Canaletto, will be displayed alongside those of modern masters Degas, Matisse, Picasso, and Cezanne. The exhibition is on view through Sunday, Feb. 15, 2015, and is accompanied by a video demonstrating printmaking processes, and texts describing the role prints held in society before the advent of photography.

“Each and every work in this exhibition is rare, and of a breathtaking quality that is no longer available on the market,” says Jerry Dobrick, the Norton’s Curatorial Associate for European Art.

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She was married to Humphrey Bogart. Shot films with the likes of John Wayne and Paul Newman. And over her long career racked up a pair of Tony Awards and an honorary Oscar. But if there was one figure who made screen legend Lauren Bacall weak in the knees it was British sculptor Henry Moore. 

Bacall, who passed away in August, was a longtime art collector, who amassed hundreds of artworks. Her tastes were broad and wide-ranging and her collection included African art and Pablo Picasso. But the actress had special affinity for works by Moore, whom she began collecting in the 1950s and first met in person in the mid-1970s.

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Four years ago, in the French newspaper "Libération," I revealed the extraordinary discovery of a previously unknown collection of works by Pablo Picasso.

The news flashed around the world. “Never before has such an important ensemble of works—completely unknown until now—been found in private hands”, said Anne Baldassari, then the director of the Musée Picasso in Paris. The value of these works could be as high as €70m.

Now, the epilogue to the story is being played out in the French courts.

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How did El Greco move from painting icons on the island of Crete to the elongated, expressionist works that made him famous and influenced artists like Pablo Picasso and Paul Cézanne? To mark the 400th anniversary of the artist’s death, three New York City museums are trying to provide an answer.

On Tuesday, the Metropolitan Museum of Art will bring out its nine El Greco paintings as well as another six lent from the Hispanic Society.

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Seventy paintings that span the 15th to the 20th centuries from the collection of the Spanish investor Juan Abelló and his wife Ana Gamazo, including works by El Greco, Francisco Goya, Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso, are due to go on show in the US for the first time. “The Abelló Collection: A Modern Taste for European Masters” will open at the Meadows Museum at the Southern Methodist University in Texas next year, 18 April-2 August.

A key work in the show is Francis Bacon’s "Triptych," 1983, one of the artist’s final works in the format, which Abelló acquired in 2008 through a private sale.

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There is very little about Picasso that John Richardson, his longtime biographer, doesn’t already know. As a friend of Picasso’s during the 1950s, while the artist was living in the south of France, Mr. Richardson saw more than most.

He can reveal juicy snippets about Picasso’s sexual escapades and recall many of his personal quirks: How Picasso would rub a concoction of oil heated with sticks of lavender into his scalp to make his hair grow; his passion for salt cod purée; his loathing of classical music. Mr. Richardson can also describe in riveting detail Picasso’s methods of painting, sculpting and drawing.

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