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Displaying items by tag: Renovation

The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens is expected to announce Wednesday that it is expanding its Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art, adding 5,000 square feet of gallery space by summer 2016.

The oldest portion of the Scott galleries is closed for renovation and the expansion. It is the third project of its kind in seven years at the San Marino museum.

The expansion features a new glass entrance and lobby and eight new rooms for art display, 8,600 square feet in all. It is in keeping with the museum's growing commitment to American art, said the announcement from the Huntington's director of art collections, Kevin Salatino.

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They seem to breathe, these 12 20th-century African masks, and to look at us with the same bold curiosity with which we examine them.

A few have birds nesting in their wooden and metal hair. Two others rise above long tangles of raffia. One artist even etched a pair of spectacles onto her mask.

Despite the charming touches, the masks are undeniably powerful and even frightening.

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The Renwick Gallery, the Smithsonian Institution’s decorative arts and crafts museum in Washington, DC, is due to reopen to the public on November 13 after a two-year, $30m renovation. Built in 1859 across from the White House, the Renwick is the first American building designed specifically to showcase art.

The inaugural exhibition, “Wonder”, will take over the entire museum. The Renwick commissioned nine contemporary artists, including Chakaia Booker, Tara Donovan, Maya Lin and Leo Villareal, to create site-specific, room-size installations out of unorthodox materials such as insects, tires and glass marbles.

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Many believe New York’s pioneering Landmarks Law, enacted in April 1965, was the key factor in the rebirth of New York in the final quarter of the 20th century (continue reading about New York's Landmarks Law on InCollect.com). It fostered pride in neighborhoods and resulted in neighborhood preservation in every borough, connecting and motivating residents and bringing new economic life to older communities. It ensured that huge swaths of the city remain a rich complex of new and old. It also ensured the creative re-use of countless buildings. At the same time, a new body of important architecture has emerged as architects, clients, and the Landmarks Preservation Commission devised innovative solutions for the renovation of landmark buildings and for new buildings in historic districts. The law spawned creativity in architects’ responses to building preservation that has enhanced the cityscape in all five boroughs.

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Pulitzer Arts Foundation, located in St. Louis, will reopen on May 1 following a major renovation that has transformed the lower level of its Tadao Ando-designed building and nearly doubled its public space. Conceived to enhance the Pulitzer’s curatorial and public program, the construction project repurposed offices and storage into 3,700 square feet of new galleries to accommodate additional exhibitions, artist-driven activities, and collaborations. The Pulitzer building is Ando’s first free-standing, public project in the United States, and the renovation, completed in consultation with Ando’s office, marks the first alteration to the building since it opened in 2001.

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To celebrate its 75th anniversary as a public institution, the Walker Art Center will embark on a $75 million renovation of its rolling campus, the final stage of an expansion that began more than a decade ago with the addition of a new building by the architects Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron. The new project will restructure the museum’s grounds and add a highly visible entrance pavilion, and it will also tie the Walker more closely to the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden across the street, home to “Spoonbridge and Cherry,” the sculpture by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen that has become a Minneapolis landmark.

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The Speed Art Museum will re-open in March of next year. On Wednesday morning, museum officials made the announcement. Officials also spoke about the Speed 365 public fundraising campaign.

The Speed Art Museum has been closed since 2012, as it undergoes a $50 million multi-phase expansion and renovation, that includes a new North Building, art park and a public piazza. The expansion nearly 80,000 square feet of renovation and 75,000 square feet of new construction.

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Dutch graphic artist Irma Boom is renowned for designing books whose contents have been filtered through her idiosyncratic view of the world. How fitting, then, that she was asked to design a book for New York’s Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum as it celebrated its recent renovation of the Carnegie Mansion.

The Cooper Hewitt is the only museum in the U.S. exclusively devoted to design, and its vast collection (more than 210,000 objects, spanning 30 centuries) must have served as a near-limitless playground for Boom’s imagination.

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On Tuesday, March 11, 2015, Thomas P. Campbell, the Director and CEO of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, announced that David Chipperfield Architects (DCA) has been selected to redesign the institution’s Southwest Wing for modern and contemporary art. The British firm will also potentially redesign the neighboring galleries for the arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, as well as additional operational spaces.

The Met’s selection process included an international design competition led by a committee of the museum’s Board of Trustees. According to a press release from the Met, Campbell said, “We based the final selection of an architect on three criteria: vision, experience, and compatibility. David Chipperfield’s global architectural experience and sensibility, along with his commitment to the collaborative aspect of creating architecture, make him a perfect partner on this milestone project.”

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Patience, says architect Annabelle Selldorf, is a virtue she’s acquired over time.

That’s fortunate, as it’s probably going to be at least 2019 before the renovation she is designing for the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego is completed. More fundraising ($50 million for the project; $20 million for an operating endowment), more permitting and more planning has to be accomplished before construction could start in 2017.

“We’re finding our way, and we’ll do whatever it takes, come here as frequently as they will allow us, and develop the design little by little as funds become available, as permits are within reach,” said Selldorf, who was engaged by the museum nearly a year ago. “It’s a long process, but I feel the path is very clear.”

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