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The Oklahoma City Museum of Art is the opening venue for the national tour of “Gods and Heroes: Masterpieces from the École des Beaux-Arts, Paris.” Opening June 21, the blockbuster exhibition is organized by American Federation of Arts and the École des Beaux-Arts, Paris. The exhibition chronicles the history of one of Europe’s most celebrated and influential art academies, while showcasing a stunning array of French masterpieces. With works that span more than two centuries, the exhibition will provide visitors an intimate view of an institution that produced some of France’s most accomplished artists and left a profound impact on Western art.

“The legacy of the École des Beaux-Arts cannot be understated,” said Oklahoma City Museum of Art President and CEO, E. Michael Whittington. “Until World War II, Paris was the center of the art world, and generations of American artists made their pilgrimage to study at the École. To have this great collection with its star-studded cast of artists now coming to the United States is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for the people of Oklahoma.”

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Titian’s “Danae,” an Italian Renaissance painting noted for its sensuality, will be on display at the National Gallery of Art from July 1 through Nov. 2.

The painting by the master of the Venetian school, on loan from the Capodimonte Museum in Naples, will help celebrate the beginning of Italy’s presidency of the Council of the European Union, which runs July 1 through Dec. 31. Two other examples of Titian’s work in this genre, “Venus With a Mirror” and “Venus and Adonis,” from the Gallery’s permanent collection, are also on view in the West Building.

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In fall 2015, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts will present “Eugène Delacroix and Modernity,” the first major exhibition to explore the legacy of the celebrated French painter, an influential trailblazer and one of the first modern masters of the form. The exhibition takes Cézanne’s observation that “we all paint in Delacroix’s language” as its starting point to reveal how Delacroix revolutionized French painting for the next generation of artists, leaving an indelible mark on Matisse, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Renoir, Degas, Monet, and others. The MIA is partnering with the National Gallery, London, for this unprecedented survey, featuring important works from the museums’ collections as well as rarely seen works from private collections. The exhibition opens at the MIA on October 18, 2015, and runs through January 10, 2016. It is on view at the National Gallery, London, February 10 through May 15, 2016.

By the time of his death, Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863) was one of the most revered artists in Paris and a hero of the avant-garde. By challenging the status quo by pushing the boundaries of the “Grand Style” of painting into the realm of modernism, he paved the way for younger artists. His large-scale paintings were the first to use the expressive, improvisational markmaking of the Impressionists, the dreamlike allusion of the Symbolists, and the bold colors of Morocco made famous 80 years later by Renoir and Matisse.

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The Shelburne Museum is expecting a lot of visitors for its new exhibition that features some of the most famous paintings in the world. It's a very rare chance for people to see the paintings from French masters.

Museum staff was putting the finishing touches on a new exhibition that opens to the public Saturday. It is called "In a New Light; French impressionism arrives in America." The centerpiece is Monet's "Le Pont, Amsterdam." It is the very first painting by Monet to become part of an American collection. It was bought from the artist in Paris by Louisine Havemeyer, mother of Shelburne Museum found Electra Havemeyer Webb.

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The Morgan Library and Museum announced today that it has tapped John Marciari to lead its department of drawings and prints. Mr. Marciari, who is currently an independent curator, previously worked as curator of European art and head of provenance research at the San Diego Museum of Art.

“I am delighted that John Marciari will be joining the talented team of curators in our department of drawings and prints,” William M. Griswold, the Morgan’s director, said in a statement. “John is a noted scholar and curator with an exceptional record of achievement in the areas of connoisseurship, collection-building, and public engagement.” (Mr. Griswold announced last month that he will leave the museum to become director of the Cleveland Museum of Art.)

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According to Italian art critic and former undersecretary of cultural heritage Vittorio Sgarbi, writing in Corriere della Sera‘s magazine Sette, a painting currently attributed to the followers of 16th-century Florentine painter Giuliano Bugiardini may actually be by Raphael. The portrait of an unknown woman was snapped up by collector Peter Silverman at Dorotheum in Vienna on April 9 for €36,900 ($50,000), well over its €15,000–20,000 estimate ($20,000–27,000), and now he is trying to have its attribution changed to the master from Urbino, Le Figaro reports.

“Vittorio Sgarbi is the first to suggest an attribution to the master, Silverman says. Now I’m going to let the experts have their say and see if a consensus emerges. For my part, all that I can say with certainty is that my wife and I are very happy to own this magnificent portrait.”

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Sandy Nairne has decided to step down in February 2015 as director of the National Portrait Gallery, London, after 12 years, to pursue his writing and advisory work, it was announced today, Thursday 12 June 2014.

Sandy Nairne says: ‘It has been a great privilege to lead such a special institution as the National Portrait Gallery, and I am very proud of what we have achieved over the past decade. The fact that two million visitors now come each year to visit exhibitions, take part in activities or see displays of this amazing Collection in London, as well as around the country or online, is testimony to the dedication of all who work at the Gallery and those who support it in so many different ways. The Gallery is in very good shape and will go from strength to strength.’

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Following a two-year refurbishment, the National Gallery’s impressive gallery space, Room A, has reopened to the public. Lying beneath the main floor galleries, this permanent display offers visitors a chance to explore 218 pictures dating from the 13th to the late 19th centuries.

This newly reopened gallery offers a different way of experiencing the nation’s collection of European paintings as it is hung in broadly chronological order, telling the entire story of 400 years of painting in a single space. It aims to enhance visitors’ appreciation and understanding of some of the National Gallery’s lesser-known paintings and it provides the space and opportunity to study these works in greater detail - and in better viewing conditions - than before. With a record-breaking 6 million visitors during 2013, the National Gallery remains committed to researching and showcasing its extraordinarily rich permanent collection.

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Mars and Venus was well-known to Nicolas Poussin scholars. But for more than a century, the oil on canvas was considered either a fake or a poor attempt by the French painter’s studio to imitate the style of the classicist master. It barely left the Louvre’s stock room.

Now new research led by Pierre Rosenberg, the director of the Louvre from 1994 to 2001, proves that Mars and Venus is indeed the real thing­–a discovery which makes it the 40th Poussin in the institution’s collection. The Figaro reports that under the piece’s darkened varnish, the conservation team in charge of a recent analysis discovered that the top of the canvas had been cut off, and the removed strips used to enlarge the piece horizontally.

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Ileana Sonnabend was one of the greatest and most influential discoverers of artistic talent of the late 20th century, known and appreciated for her intuition, strength of character, ground-breaking vision and for that eclecticism of taste and thinking that enabled her to understand and promote all that was new in American and European art. Created over many years and a material reflection of her commitment to supporting young artists and the avant-garde movements of the 20th century, her extraordinary collection now finds a “European home” in the splendid monumental rooms on the second floor of the Galleria Internazionale d’Arte Moderna at Ca’ Pesaro.

The exhibition marks the first step in a long-term collaboration with the Sonnabend Collection and Sonnabend Collection Foundation, and offers an extraordinary opportunity to enrich the city’s 20th-century art collections and the permanent displays at Ca’ Pesaro, which thanks to the works from the Ileana Sonnabend collection, will be able to offer its visitors a more comprehensive itinerary with plenty of masterpieces from the history of art of the whole of the 20th century. The Sonnabend Collection picks up exactly at the point in which Ca’ Pesaro ended its collecting spree and relationship with the Biennale, and will lead the visitor past a series of works of the highest artistic quality forming part of the principal experimental schools of the late 20th century through over 70 iconic works of the period.

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