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Displaying items by tag: landscapes

On March 25th "Landscapes of the Mind. British Landscape Painting. Tate Collection, 1690-2007" was presented for the first time ever in Mexico City, an exhibition organized by Tate in association with Museo Nacional de Arte, as part of the celebrations of the Dual Year between Mexico and the United Kingdom.

This exhibition presents 111 artworks by British and European artists, with a plurality of techniques (painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, sculpture/installation, etc.) which ponder on the evolution of British landscape in art history. The term "Britain" is understood as the geographical entity of the British Isles, i.e., the archipelago that includes England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland, before the independence of the latter in 1921.

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The Frist Center for the Visual Arts presents "Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-Century American Art" through June 7, 2015, in the Center’s Upper-Level Galleries. The exhibition features paintings and sculptures that recount stories relating to American cultural aspirations and everyday life throughout the 19th century. Narrative landscapes by Thomas Cole and Asher B. Durand of the Hudson River School, genre scenes by William Sidney Mount and Francis W. Edmonds and sculptures by John Rogers are among the highlights of the exhibition.

Assembled from the collection of the New-York Historical Society, Telling Tales integrates genre, historical, literary and religious subjects—through styles ranging from Neoclassicism to Realism—to paint a vivid portrait of American art and life during the country’s most formative century. The exhibition is organized into six sections: “American History Painting,” “English Literature and History,” “Importing the Grand Manner,” “Genre Paintings,” “Economic, Social, and Religious Division” and “Picturing the Outsider.”

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The Clark Art Institute has received sixty-three Japanese color woodblock prints, dating from 1832 to 1971, from long-time Clark docent Adele Rodbell. The Rodbell Family Collection includes landscape prints spanning from the late ukiyo-e through the shin hanga and sōsaku hanga movements of the 1920s and ‘30s to postwar Japan.

Among the works are a Hokusai landscape, a number of works from Hiroshige’s series “100 Famous Views of Edo,” and the Zen architecture prints of Saitō.

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The Seattle Art Museum and New England’s Clark Art Institute are wagering temporary loans of major paintings based on the outcome of Super Bowl XLIX between the Seattle Seahawks and the New England Patriots. The masterpieces that have been anted up showcase the beautiful landscapes of the Northwest and the Northeast respectively.

The Stakes: "The majestic Puget Sound on the Pacific Coast" from 1870 by Albert Bierstadt from SAM’s American art collection is wagered by Kimerly Rorschach, SAM’s Illsley Ball Nordstrom Director and CEO. Winslow Homer’s masterpiece, "West Point, Prout's Neck" (1900), one of the greatest works in the Clark’s noted Homer collection, is wagered by Michael Conforti, director of the Clark Art Institute. The winning museum will receive a three-month loan of the prized artwork. All shipping and expenses will be paid by the losing museum.

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Dutch painters of the 17th century vastly expanded the artist's palate — and his palette. Suddenly, a new array of subjects was deemed suitable for depiction: including peasant life, landscapes, townscapes, maritime paintings, flower paintings and a variety of still lifes. "The era was a huge turning point in terms of opening up the realms of what could be painted," said John Nolan, curator of the Bob Jones University Museum and Gallery.

A new exhibition at BJU's Museum and Gallery explores the vivid paintings of the Dutch Golden Age. Twelve works from a private New York collector are being displayed in addition to the museum's permanent collection of dozens of Dutch and Flemish works by Rembrandt, Rubens, van Dyck and many others.

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At a press reception held Jan. 16 prior to the opening of the Brandywine River Museum of Art’s major retrospective of Jamie Wyeth’s work, Jamie Wyeth repeatedly expressed his unease at “revisiting his early work.” He said that he knew he “grew from his early work” but that it “doesn’t interest him” to see it now. While he may express such sentiments, those attending the exhibition will find much to fascinate and engage them as they follow his development as an artist. The exciting exhibition on the walls of the Brandywine galleries which have been painted in handsome hues of burgundy and maroon to complement the paintings, examines his distinctive approach to realism over the course of six decades, from his earliest portraits to the present. Landscapes of the Brandywine Valley and coastal Maine, family members and fellow artists (including the engaging portrait of Andy Warhol painted in 1976, whom he described as “very childlike”), are shown as well as domesticated and wild animals, many executed in “combined mediums,” the term he uses to describe his technique.

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The 35th annual AIPAD Photography Show in New York is planned for April 16–19 at the Park Avenue Armory. This year's iteration will feature photography from 89 galleries around the world, as well as a special selection of short films presented by ART21 curator Wesley Miller. Called "New York Close Up," the films by Rashid Johnson, Liz Magic Lase, Martha Colburn, Daniel Gordon, and others will be on view for the duration of the fair.

AIPAD is the longest-running photography fair in the world, presenting a diverse range of works from portraits and self-portraits (a portrait of Georgia O'Keeffe by Alfred Stieglitz will on view at Edwynn Houk Gallery) to landscapes and fashion photography (Louis Faurer's 1962 works for "Harper's Bazaar" will be available at Deborah Bell Photographs).

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Its death sentence came down in a public courtroom, but the priceless estate of the Corcoran Gallery of Art is being divvied up under a cloak of secrecy.

Museum-goers who grew up with Rembrandt Peale’s portrait of George Washington and George Inness’s landscapes don’t know if these and other treasures from the city’s oldest private museum will hang on the walls of the National Gallery of Art or at one of the Smithsonian museums — or if they will be consigned to a storage facility.

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Thomas Cole’s sublime “The Course of Empire,” 1833–36, a cycle of five large-scale paintings depicting the rise and fall of a civilization, headlines “Nature and the American Vision: The Hudson River School,” an exhibition of 45 landscapes that opened at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on December 7.

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Whether a sacred sanctuary, a place for scientific study, a haven for the solitary thinker or a space for pure enjoyment and delight, gardens are where mankind and nature meet. A new exhibition at The Queen's Gallery, Buckingham Palace will explore the many ways in which the garden has been celebrated in art through over 150 paintings, drawings, books, manuscripts and decorative arts from the Royal Collection, including some of the earliest and rarest surviving records of gardens and plants.

From spectacular paintings of epic royal landscapes to jewel-like manuscripts and delicate botanical studies, "Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden" reveals the changing character of the garden and its enduring appeal for artists from the 16th to the early 20th century, including Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt van Rijn and Carl Fabergé.

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