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Displaying items by tag: permanent collection

A museum rarely publicizes its doubts about rights to works in its collection—but that’s what Amsterdam’s Stedelijk Museum is doing in an exhibition that opens Friday.

“The Stedelijk Museum in the Second World War” recounts the daring ways in which the museum’s employees fought Nazi censors after Germany conquered the Netherlands in May 1940. But the show also features 16 works in the permanent collection by artists including Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky and Henri Matisse that the museum says it might not rightfully own.

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You have likely heard the saying, "go big or go home." Defined in the Urban Dictionary as to "do whatever you are doing to its fullest," the term has been somewhat overused in modern language.

Since the 1940s, many artists have expressed the idea of going big through the size of their paintings. For those curious about the effect of standing before a large-scale painting, don't miss "XL: Large-Scale Paintings from the Permanent Collection" at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College. Mary-Kay Lombino, curator, provided this statement about the exhibit: "By going big, artists radically extended the tenets of modernism. Their paintings, thanks to their monumental scale, had an emotional effect on their spectators."

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Dutch painters of the 17th century vastly expanded the artist's palate — and his palette. Suddenly, a new array of subjects was deemed suitable for depiction: including peasant life, landscapes, townscapes, maritime paintings, flower paintings and a variety of still lifes. "The era was a huge turning point in terms of opening up the realms of what could be painted," said John Nolan, curator of the Bob Jones University Museum and Gallery.

A new exhibition at BJU's Museum and Gallery explores the vivid paintings of the Dutch Golden Age. Twelve works from a private New York collector are being displayed in addition to the museum's permanent collection of dozens of Dutch and Flemish works by Rembrandt, Rubens, van Dyck and many others.

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A museum commemorating the artistic community in the Paris neighborhood of Montparnasse has been permanently shuttered by the City of Paris, French art newspaper "Le quotidien de l’art" reported. The Musée du Montparnasse, established in 1996 in an historic building that originally served as the atelier of Russian artist Marie Vassilieff in the early 20th century, first closed its doors following a September 2013 audit ordered by the City of Paris, which owns the museum’s 4,600-square-foot building at 21 avenue du Maine in the 15th arrondissement. The audit deemed the museum not in compliance with the city’s rubric for an institution of its kind for lacking a permanent collection — this despite its founding designation by the city’s cultural affairs bureau as “a location emblematic of the artistic history of Paris.”

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The Hyde Collection opens its 2015 exhibition schedule with an exhibition drawn from the permanent collection of the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake, New York. From January 18, 2015, through April 12, 2015, "Wild Nature: Masterworks from the Adirondack Museum" will be on view in The Hyde’s Wood Gallery.

Over the course of two centuries, the Adirondack Mountains in Upstate New York have attracted tourists, sportsmen, and artists alike from across the nation. "Wild Nature" features sixty-two stunning masterpieces dating from 1821 to 2001, including paintings and rarely-exhibited photographs and prints. Together these works reveal how images of the Adirondack landscape shaped American perceptions of the wilderness landscape, and how these expectations, in turn, created wilderness as a national icon.

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With over 100 works generously loaned from 30 collections, the Stedelijk Museum presents "The Oasis of Matisse" next spring. For the first time in over sixty years, the work of the French master will go on view in the Netherlands. Never before have so many of his works been on show in this country.

The Stedelijk has conceived a unique exhibition concept for this survey: the permanent collection on the museum’s ground floor will be enriched with a selection of Henri Matisse’s (1868-1854) classic pieces, creating surprising combinations with the work of his contemporaries, teachers, and followers. In this way, both the work of one of the most important artists of the twentieth century as well as other artists can be seen in a new light, and visitors will be able to encounter Matisse’s art at every stage of his artistic development.

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Monday, 29 December 2014 11:08

The Hood Museum Receives Two Major Gifts of Art

It was a very good year for the Hood Museum of Art. In 2014, the Dartmouth College institution received two major donations of artwork from alums. The college was already an art lovers' destination, offering such attractions as the stunning "The Epic of American Civilization" mural by José Clemente Orozco in the Baker Library. Exhibits included the likes of Picasso prints, aboriginal paintings, and the recently closed "Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties." The gifts of contemporary photography from Nancy and Tom O'Neil (class of '79) and of European and American art from the late Barbara J. and David G. Stahl (class of '47) add nearly 160 pieces to the Hood's permanent collection.

It's not every day — or year — that a college art museum can boast such acquisitions.

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"In Focus: Play," on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center from December 23, 2014 through May 10, 2015, presents photographs that explore how notions of leisure and play have been represented over the course of the medium’s history. The nearly thirty works from the Museum’s permanent collection highlight a wide range of amusing activities, from quiet games like chess to more boisterous forms of recreation like skateboarding and visits to amusement parks and circuses. All of the photographs included in the exhibition illustrate the many ways people have chosen to spend their free time. The images also demonstrate inventive and improvised approaches, like unusual vantage points and jarring juxtapositions that photographers have employed to help capture the spontaneity of playfulness.

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Until 2005, the 78-year-old Institute of Contemporary Art had no permanent collection, assembling most of its shows with borrowed works. Philanthropist and ICA board member Barbara Lee gave the museum one of its first pieces: British sculptor Cornelia Parker’s “Hanging Fire (Suspected Arson),” an ethereal work that has become a favorite of visitors.

Now Lee has given the ICA a much weightier gift: a group of 43 works by 25 international artists, all women. The Barbara Lee Collection of Art by Women, the institution’s largest gift of art ever, will expand the ICA’s holdings by roughly 30 percent, ICA director Jill Medvedow said.

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Recent additions of artwork representing medieval Europe, the Ancient Americas, 20th-century photography, and contemporary art further enhance the Cleveland Museum of Art’s permanent collection. World-renowned for its quality and breadth, the collection represents almost 45,000 objects and 6,000 years of achievement in the arts.

The latest acquisitions include a Virgin and Child, a rare 13th-century wooden sculpture from the Mosan region of Europe; a Standing Female Figure, a clay figure representative of the Classic Veracruz period on Mexico’s Gulf Coast; and Just the two of us, one of contemporary artist Julia Wachtel’s first paintings to employ cartoons. The museum also announced the addition of eight photographs by Ansel Adams, a gift from Frances P. Taft, a longtime museum supporter and trustee.

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