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Displaying items by tag: permanent collection

The first four paintings from private collections to undergo conservation treatment in the Dallas Museum of Art’s new Paintings Conservation Studio are currently on view in the institution’s European galleries. The studio, which opened in November, is part of the museum’s initiative to create a more comprehensive in-house conservation program.

One of the works, ‘The Blacksmith Cupids’ by the French painter Charles-Antoine Coypel, has entered the Dallas Museum of Art’s permanent collection. It is the first work by the artist to enter the museum’s collection. The other newly restored works -- Jean-Baptiste Oudry’s ‘Dogs Playing with Birds in a Park,’ a Renaissance painting titled ‘Saint Ursula Protecting the Eleven Thousand Virgins with her Cloak’ and an Italian 14th-century painted wood panel--will remain on loan to the museum.

The institution’s new conservation program involves collaborating with private collectors on the study and care of their illustration collections. The works will then be presented in the Dallas Museum of Art’s galleries for public viewing. The museum’s conservation studio, which features cutting-edge technology including a digital X-ray system, is enclosed by a glass wall so that guests of the museum can observe daily conservation activity.

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Wednesday, 20 November 2013 19:15

Kimbell Art Museum Prepares to Unveil New Building

The Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas has completed its Piano Pavilion, a glass, concrete and wood structure that has tripled the institution’s gallery space. The addition, which was designed by architect Renzo Piano, will also house classrooms, an expanded library, underground parking and an auditorium.

The new building sits 65 yards from the museum’s original structure which was created in 1972 by Louis Kahn, Piano’s mentor. The two structures are adjoined on the Piano Pavilion’s western side, seamlessly merging the new with the old. The Piano Pavilion will house the Kimbell Museum’s permanent collection, which includes European and American art and antiquities as well as Precolumbian and Oceanic art.

The Kimbell Art Museum, which is free to the public, will officially open its Piano Pavilion on November 27, 2013.   

 

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The Cincinnati Art Museum presents Degas, Renoir, and Poetic Pastels, an exhibition featuring a selection of the most famous pastel drawings in the world. The works are drawn from the museum’s permanent collection and include landscapes by Alfred Sisley, Edgar Degas’ ballet dancers, and portraits by Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

Pastel, which is derived from the Latin word pasta, or “paste,” has been a popular medium for artists since the 15th century. Degas, Renoir, and their contemporaries enjoyed the medium because it didn’t need time to dry and boasted rich, saturated hues. The works on view at the Cincinnati Art Museum, which are from the second half of the 19th century, are rarely on view due to their sensitivity to light.

Degas, Renoir, and Poetic Pastels will be on view through January 19, 2014.

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Maine’s Portland Museum of Art is currently hosting the exhibition Winslow Homer’s Civil War in conjunction with the Maine Civil War Trail’s statewide series of special displays commemorating the 150th anniversary of the conflict. The exhibition features 29 wood engravings and other prints drawn from the museum’s permanent collection.

Homer, one of the most celebrated American artists of all time, first gained national recognition for images of the Civil War that he produced for the magazine Harper’s Weekly. An artist-correspondent amidst Union troops, Homer had a first-hand view of the war, which he translated into unconventional interpretations of the struggle. Rather than illustrating battle scenes exalting the men, Homer humanized the event, creating scenes of day-to-day life in a soldier camp and the impact of the war on women and the home front.

Winslow Homer’s Civil War will be on view at the Portland Museum of Art through December 8, 2013.

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The Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford, CT presents An Artificial Wilderness: The Landscape of Contemporary Photography, the institution’s first photography exhibition in nearly a decade. An Artificial Wilderness is pulled almost entirely from the Atheneum’s permanent collection (save one private loan) and explores man’s relationship to the natural landscape.

The exhibition features works by 16 prominent photographers and spans from the 1960s to the present. Works by Andy Goldsworthy, Ed Ruscha, Olafur Eliasson and Louise Lawler are on view and explore such themes as construction, destruction and humanity’s disregard for the physical world.

An Artificial Wilderness: The Landscape of Contemporary Photography will be on view at the Wadsworth Atheneum through January 5, 2014.

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On Wednesday, August 28, 2013, Ann Goldstein announced that she will resign as director of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Goldstein has helmed the museum since 2010 and oversaw its recent expansion, which reached completion in September 2012. Goldstein will leave her post on December 1, 2013.

After announcing her sudden departure, Goldstein released the following statement:

 It has been a privilege to serve this great institution, to oversee its re-opening after nearly nine years of closure, and to live and work in a community that deeply values the vital presence of the Stedelijk Museum in people’s lives. While assuming responsibility for a closed museum presented tremendous challenges, it also offered unexpected opportunities. With The Temporary Stedelijk (2010–12) we were able to reconsider what a museum could be for its publics—open or closed—offering exhibitions, public programs and education initiatives in our unfinished historic museum building and throughout Amsterdam prior to our reopening. Now, nearly a year since our reopening, we have achieved our long-anticipated goal of a fully functioning, international museum with an exhibition schedule that prepared for the next two years. I announced my resignation to the Supervisory Board on June 26, 2013, confident that my work is done and the museum is firmly poised for a new artistic director to lead it into the future. I feel a strong affection for this remarkable institution’s exceptionally devoted staff, board, and community, and have often said that the esteemed and inspiring history of the Stedelijk is part of my DNA as a museum professional. It will surely always remain close to my heart.

During her time at the Stedelijk, Goldstein helped acquire over 1,500 works for the museum’s permanent collection; over 600 of those pieces were donated. There has been some speculation that Goldstein will return to the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art where she served as the senior curator from 1983 to 2009.

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The National Academy Museum in New York presents William Trost Richards: Visions of Land and Sea. The exhibition features approximately 60 works by the 19th century painter from the museum’s permanent collection. The National Academy houses a significant collection of Richards’ works thanks to the estate of the artist’s daughter, Anna Richards Brewster, which bequeathed over 100 works spanning Richards’ career to the museum in 1954.

William Trost Richards, a native of Philadelphia, was an American landscape painter associated with the Hudson River School as well as the American Pre-Raphaelite movement. Richards studied intermittently with the German-born landscape painter Paul Weber in the 1850s and greatly admired the works of Thomas Cole, Frederic Edwin Church and the English Pre-Raphaelites. Richards is best known for his landscapes and marine paintings of Rhode Island, the White Mountains and the shorelines of Great Britain, France and Norway.

William Trost Richards: Visions of Land and Sea will be on view at the National Academy Museum through September 8, 2013.

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Exhibition areas in three Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C. will close on Wednesday, May 1, 2013 due to substantial budget cuts known as federal sequestration. Parts of the National Museum of African Art, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, and the Smithsonian Castle will be closed through September 30, 2013.

The closures are part of a sweeping $42 million budget cut that began March 1, 2013 and will last through the end of the fiscal year. The diminished security budget is the main reason officials decided to shut down certain parts of the Smithsonian. Cuts to travel and building maintenance as well as a hiring freeze were announced when the sequestration first went into effect. Smithsonian officials claim that no major exhibition areas will be affected by the closures.

The Smithsonian Castle will close the Commons, a room that features objects from around the Smithsonian; the National Museum of African Art will shutter a section of its permanent exhibition, African Mosaic; and the Hirshhorn Museum will close various sections of its third floor galleries, which house its permanent collection.

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The Louvre’s new outpost in Abu Dhabi, which is slated to open in 2015, has assembled the 130 paintings, miniatures, sculptures, and other artworks that will form its permanent collection. Museum officials allowed reporters a sneak peek of the works including paintings by Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), Rene Magritte (1898-1967), Édouard Manet (1832-1883), and Paul Gauguin (1848-1903). The entire collection will be on view from April 22 to July 20, 2013 as part of the exhibition The Birth of a Museum at a gallery on the island of Saadiyat, close to where construction for the new museum is currently underway.

Louvre Abu Dhabi’s collection is comprised of numerous works from private collections, many of which have never been on public view before. Highlights from the museum’s holdings include Picasso’s gouache, ink, and collage work on paper Portrait of a Lady (1928); Gauguin’s Children Wrestling (1888); and Paul Klee’s (1879-1940) Oriental Bliss (1938).

The Louvre’s new venue, which was designed by the French architect Jean Nouvel, is the museum’s first branch outside of France. The venture is expected to bring the Louvre and its French partner museums approximately $1.31 million over 30 years. The Louvre also has an offshoot location in the northern city of Lens.

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A group of leading artists, artist estates, collectors, and dealer has donated 25 works of art to benefit the Whitney Museum of American Art’s new Renzo Piano-designed building in downtown Manhattan. The works, which are said to be worth upward of $8 million, will be put up for auction at Sotheby’s New York from May 14-15, 2013.

All of the artists involved in the multifaceted gift have strong ties to the Whitney and are represented in the museum’s stellar permanent collection. The most valuable work that will be up for auction in May is Jasper Johns’ (b. 1930) oil on canvas painting Untitled (2012), which is estimated to sell for $1.5 million to $2 million. Johns has had five solo shows at the Whitney and has participated in over 37 group exhibitions; the donation came directly from the artist. Other highlights from the sale include a Jeff Koons (b. 1955) silkscreen on stainless steel, a Cy Twombly (1928-2011) work on paper, a recent nude by John Currin (b. 1962), and other works by John Baldessari (b. 1931), Andy Warhol (1928-1987), and Ed Ruscha (b. 1937).    

All of the profits from the sale will directly benefit the Whitney’s new building, which is expected to open in the High Line District in 2015.

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