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Displaying items by tag: photographs

On Saturday, May 30, the Farnsworth Art Museum in Rockland will open "Andy and Kosti," an exhibition of paintings by Andrew Wyeth and photographs by Kosti Ruohomaa, which will be on display in the museum's Wyeth Center through November 1.

The exhibition explores the friendship between Maine artists Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009) and Kosti Ruohomaa (1913-1961). Both were famous for their iconic depictions of Maine life and the people who called Maine home, from farmers to fishermen.

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Though “Dance: Movement, Rhythm, Spectacle” occupies just one large room (arranged to feel like three) at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, it seems to open windows in many directions. Its exhibits range from the 1890s to the 1980s, vividly demonstrating how radically that century brought change to social dance, dance theater and ideas of dance in art. Diversely diverse, the show, which opened this month, offers a panoply of artistic media (photographs, paintings, watercolors, prints, woodcuts, etchings, graphite drawings, lithographs and film), dancers of various races and a huge assortment of dance costumes.

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Following the recent acquisition of more than 600 works from the Shunk-Kender Photography Collection, The Museum of Modern Art presents "Art on Camera: Photographs by Shunk-Kender, 1960–1971," on view through October 4, 2015. The photographers Harry Shunk (German, 1924–2006) and János Kender (Hungarian, 1937– 2009) worked together under the name Shunk-Kender from the late 1950s to the early 1970s, based first in Paris and then in New York. Shunk-Kender photographed artworks, events, and landmark exhibitions of avant-garde movements of the era, from Nouveau Réalisme to Earth art.

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Images of painter Jackson Pollock at work in his studio are well known: The seemingly dark and brooding artist is crouched on the floor, intensely dripping or flicking brightly colored paint onto his canvases.

Lesser known is the artist's domestic side: carefully carving a turkey at home on Thanksgiving afternoon, for instance, or lovingly trimming his father's hair.

A new book, "Artists Unframed," presents more than 100 photographs from the collections of the Smithsonian Archives of American Art, all depicting famous artists in intimate, personal moments.

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Queens College was the fortuitous recipient of a wide-ranging assortment of photographs from the Matthew R. Bergey Collection. Twenty-nine are on display, arranged in chronological order, beginning with an anonymous “Seashell Still Life” from 19th-century France and Roger Fenton’s “Classic Bust (from the British Museum)” (c. 1860s). These are followed by a portrait from Julia Margaret Cameron and an architectural picture from Eugène Atget, two of the most admired photographers from the second half of the 19th century.

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You may recognize Frida Kahlo from her self-portraits paintings, or from the many black and white photographs taken of her—often dressed in elaborate and traditional Mexican clothing. But few know that over 300 of her belongings were hidden in the bathroom of her Mexico City home for nearly 50 years.

After the artist’s death in 1954, her husband Diego Rivera ordered that her wardrobe and other personal objects be locked up until 15 years after his death.

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The Phillips Collection’s Director Dorothy Kosinski announced today the acquisition of several hundred gifts of photography to the museum’s permanent collection, accepted from a small group of collectors. Nearly 300 of the photographs were given to the museum in 2014, increasing the collection by more than 25 percent. Many of these new acquisitions, including superb color prints and black-and-white photographs from masters such as Berenice Abbott, Esther Bubley, Louis Faurer, and Joel Meyerowitz, will be displayed at the museum for the first time on June 6 with the opening of the special exhibition "American Moments: Photographs from The Phillips Collection."

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“Cheap, quick, and dirty, that's how I like it,” Robert Frank is said to have replied when he first heard about the plans for his exhibition at Museum Folkwang in Essen, Germany titled “Robert Frank, Books and Films, 1947-2014." Rather than present his works as pristine prints in a white cube atmosphere, the exhibition features Frank’s photographs on inkjet-printed rolls of newsprint, up to four meters long, glued directly to the hallways of the museum.

Frank’s status as a photographer is legendary, as is his skepticism about the established art market.

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The prizes of a new exhibition at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum are a pair of photographs of the artist at the easel, an aspect of her life and work that she rarely permitted photographers to capture. “My greatest desire for acquiring the collection and still my favorite photographs are two that show O’Keeffe in the act of painting,” said Carolyn Kastner, curator of "New Photography Acquisitions." “There is one each by Ansel Adams and Alfred Stieglitz, which are the only photographers she allowed to show her at work.” The exhibition, which opened on Friday, March 27, offers a selection from the museum’s collection of more than 2,000 photographs, including the newest acquisitions.

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The Ryerson Image Center is the recipient of an archive of nearly 13,000 photographs and negatives by the acclaimed 20th century photographer Berenice Abbott.

The archive, a donation from a group of anonymous donors, represents the largest and most comprehensive collection of Abbott’s work in the world.

Abbott, who died in 1991, was best known for her project "Changing New York," in which she doggedly documented the transition of New York City during the Great Depression and the years leading up to the war. Her project, financed by Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Federal Art Project, has become perhaps the definitive document of the city’s transition to modernity.

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