News Articles Library Event Photos Contact Search


Displaying items by tag: photographs

This fall, Phillips will sell photographs from the Art Institute of Chicago’s illustrious collection. Works by Robert Frank, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Edward Weston and Irving Penn will be offered during sales in October in New York and in November in London.

The Art Institute of Chicago began organizing photography exhibitions in 1900 and has been building its own collection for nearly 65 years. Ellen Sandor, Chair and Curator of the Art Institute of Chicago’s photography department, said, “In 2014 we celebrate our fortieth anniversary as a separate curatorial department and the fifth anniversary of our dedicated galleries in the Art Institute’s Modern Wing. Those two anniversaries represent continuity and change—both essential to our progress. We have spent three and a half years to assess our holdings, with a view to refining and diversifying the collection as well as better understanding the treasures that we possess. Proceeds from the sale will support future acquisitions, and we are grateful to Phillips for working with such care and consideration on this sale.”

The two sales will be complemented by an online selling exhibition in December. Highlights from the collection will go on view in New York, Chicago and London prior to the sales.

Published in News

In honor of its 100th anniversary, the Montclair Art Museum in Montclair, NJ is currently hosting the exhibition ‘100 Works for 100 Years: A Centennial Celebration.’ The show is organized chronologically and features works from the museum’s permanent collection that reflect its rich history.

The exhibition was unveiled at the museum’s 100th Birthday Party on January 15 and includes works by Childe Hassam, Asher B. Durand, Thomas Eakins, Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, Robert Henri, Edward Hopper, Mark Rothko, Robert Motherwell and Andy Warhol. ‘100 Works for 100 Years’ will be on view through July 31.

The Montclair Art Museum is devoted to American art and Native American art forms. Its collection consists of over 12,000 works and includes paintings, prints, drawings, photographs and sculpture dating from the 18th century to the present. The museum has the only gallery in the world dedicated solely to the work of the 19th century American painter George Inness, who lived and worked in Montclair.       


Published in News

A book published by Rizzoli New York will accompany the exhibition ‘Impressionists on the Water,’ which is currently on view at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, MA. The show presents over 90 paintings, prints, models and photographs by artists such as Edouard Manet, Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, Georges Seurat and Alfred Sisley and explores how France’s waterways and oceans influenced these masters of Impressionism.

The book ‘Impressionists on the Water’ includes scholarly essays that examine the historical and cultural aspects of the nautical themes embraced by the Impressionists. The volume also charts the changing depictions of water from Pre-Impressionism through Impressionism to neo- and post-Impressionism. Contributors include Phillip Dennis Cate, a specialist in nineteenth-century French art; Daniel Charles, a noted historian with a particular expertise in maritime heritage; and Christopher Lloyd, Surveyor of the Queen’s Pictures, who is responsible for the care and maintenance of the UK’s royal collection of pictures.

‘Impressionists on the Water’ is available through Rizzoli’s website. The exhibition will be on view at the Peabody Essex Museum through February 17, 2014.


Published in News

The Roy Lichtenstein Foundation has announced that it will donate its remarkable Harry Shunk and Shunk-Kender Photography Collection to five major institutions -- the Getty Research Institute, the Museum of Modern Art, the National Gallery of Art, the Centre Pompidou, and the Tate. The collection includes approximately 200,000 black-and-white prints, color prints, negatives, contact sheets, color transparencies, and slides.

The Foundation’s donation is unique in that it will establish a consortium among the institutions that will both receive and share the materials. The collection of photographic material was shot by the late Harry Shunk and Janos Kender, and dates from approximately 1958 to 1973. Many of the images capture notable artists such as Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Robert Rauschenberg, Joan Miro, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, Man Ray, Barnett Newman, and Alexander Calder.

The photographs were acquired by the Foundation between 2008 and 2012, several years after Shunk’s death. The Foundation went on to preserve, catalogue and digitize the works, eventually creating a free online archive.

Published in News

Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Museum of Art has acquired 50 works from the Carnegie International, North America's oldest exhibition of contemporary art from around the globe.

The purchases were approved by the museum on Thursday, December 12 and they are the first of two rounds of acquisitions from the International, which opened on October 5. Additional purchases will be announced in the New Year. So far, the Carnegie Museum has added a number of films to its collection as well as a large-scale sculpture by British artist Phyllida Barlow, photographs by Zoe Strauss, and drawings by Iranian artist Rokni Haerizadeh.

The International was launched in 1896 by industrialist Andrew Carnegie to help grow the museum’s collection as well as educate and inspire the public.

Published in News

New York’s American Folk Art Museum has launched a public, digital archive of 117 issues of magazines published by the institution between 1971 and 2008. ‘The Clarion,’ which was later renamed ‘Folk Art’ was published three times a year and served as a leading forum for original research and new scholarship in the realm of American folk art. The archive, which is organized chronologically, includes original articles, photographs, illustrations, advertisements and calendars.

The digitization and archive creation was made possible thanks to a grant from Museum Trustee Karin Fielding and her husband, Dr. Jonathan Fielding as well as donations from the Friends of Heritage Preservation and the American Folk Art Society.

The archive can be found on the American Folk Art Museum’s website.

Published in News

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art has received a $1.8 million gift from Oman; it is the largest donation in the institution’s history. The bequest will fund a series of programs called “Connecting the Gems of the Indian Ocean: From Oman to East Africa,” which will focus on Omani art and the connections between cultures in East and North Africa and the Middle East.

The National Museum of African Art, which was founded in 1964, holds about 9,000 works, making it the largest publicly held collection of African Art in the United States. The museum’s holdings include musical instruments, sculpture, jewelry, textiles, photographs, and pottery.

Published in News

Tobias Natter, director of Vienna’s Leopold Museum, abruptly announced his resignation to protest ties between museum board members and a new foundation established to manage the Gustav Klimt collection once belonging to Gustav Ucicky, the artist’s son and a director of Nazi propaganda films.

Natter told Bloomberg, “I see this as a huge problem for the museum. Ucicky collected in the Nazi era. The shadow of looted art has hung so heavily over the Leopold in the past years. Why do we have to get into bed with these people? It is incompatible and a conflict of interests in so many different ways.” The Gustav Klimt Wien 1900 foundation owns 4 oil paintings by the artist as well as 10 drawings and an assortment of other documents and photographs. The entire collection is estimated to be worth $275 million. Ucicky’s wife, Ursula, who was given the collection upon her husband’s death in 1961, established the new foundation.

In 2010, The Leopold Museum paid $19 million to the heirs of the Jewish art dealer Lea Bondi Jaray to settle a decades-long dispute over a portrait by Egon Schiele. The museum has faced a spate of other restitution claims over the years.

 

Published in News

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston presents the exhibition The Inscrutable Eye: Watercolors by John Singer Sargent, which includes eight paintings that explore the artist’s relationship with the museum’s founder, Isabella Stewart Gardner. The show runs concurrent to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston’s exhibition John Singer Sargent Watercolors.

Sargent and Gardner shared a long-lasting friendship after meeting at the artist’s studio in London in 1886 by arrangement of their mutual friend, the writer Henry James. Besides the watercolors, the exhibition includes personal mementos such as letters and photographs that span their lifelong friendship.

The Gardner Museum is home to numerous works by Sargent as Gardner acquired 42 of his paintings during their acquaintance. The institution’s holdings span every stage of Sargent’s career and include genre paintings, formal oil paintings, watercolors, studies for public murals and personal sketches. Gardner acquired many of the watercolor paintings on display through buying gifts Sargent made for his friends as they came onto the public market.

The Inscrutable Eye: Watercolors by John Singer Sargent will be on view at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum through January 20, 2014.

Published in News
Friday, 01 November 2013 18:54

Exhibition of Western Art to Open in Atlanta

On November 3, 2013 the High Museum of Art in Atlanta will present the exhibition Go West! Art of the American Frontier from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. Through more than 250 paintings, sculptures, photographs and Native American artifacts, the show will explore the changing notion of the American West, which evolved considerably between 1830 and 1930. The exhibition also addresses the varied and oftentimes conflicting representations of Native Americans, which ranged from portrayals of fierce warriors to menacing enemies.

The works included in Go West! Are on loan from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, a museum and cultural center in Cody, Wyoming. Highlights include a bronze sculpture by Frederic Remington, illustrations by N.C. Wyeth created during his time as a ranch-hand, and Annie Oakley’s rifle.

Go West! will be on view at the High Museum through April 3, 2014.

Published in News
Page 9 of 14
Events