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Displaying items by tag: sculptures

An Austin museum specializing in contemporary Latin American art has roughly 12 new pieces to display courtesy of a former Tyler couple.

The Blanton Museum of Art at The University of Texas at Austin campus was gifted 12 modern and contemporary art pieces, including paintings, drawings and sculptures from college alumni Judy and Charles Tate, who now live in the Houston area.

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The British Museum is considering three further overseas loans from the Elgin Marbles – but a reluctance to entertain the sculptures’ return to Greece is set to provoke renewed anger in Athens.

Last year the British Museum allowed part of the Marbles to leave the country for the first time when it lent the headless statue of Ilissos, a Greek river god, to the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg.

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They span 75 feet, weigh 4,300 pounds and can’t move.

The four, black aluminum clouds comprising the once-mobile component of “Mountains and Clouds”—one of the final works of sculptor Alexander Calder, which dominates the Hart Senate office building’s 90-foot-high atrium—haven’t drifted for more than a decade. They once rotated at a gentle speed, but have been frozen in place for years after a bearing failed.

Now, Sen. Chris Murphy, a Democrat from Connecticut, where Mr. Calder often worked, is pushing to restore the artistic integrity of the design advanced by Mr. Calder, whose mobiles and other works often incorporated movement.

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Abstract paintings and sculptures were once the gold standard of Modern art. They spoke of adventurous aesthetic expeditions into hitherto unexplored visual realms.

Since the 1950s the figurative banner was held high by marvelous painters such as David Park in San Francisco, Jane Freilicher in New York and many others, but abstraction, nonetheless, ruled. By the late 1970s, though, change was underway.

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"It's one of my favorite places in the world to show my work," glass artist Dale Chihuly said of the Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden in Coral Gables, Florida, at the December 6 opening of his sprawling site-specific exhibition.

Throughout the garden's 83 acres, Chihuly and his team set 24 installations of his well-known glass sculptures at various sites—among them: sweeping meadows, palm forests, and a butterfly farm.

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Palm Springs Art Museum will feature the exhibition "Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads: Gold," a group of sculptures by internationally acclaimed contemporary Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, from December 20 through May 31, 2015 at the Palm Springs Art museum.
 
The installation consists of 12 gilded bronze animal heads - rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog, and pig - that are each a representative symbol from the ancient Chinese zodiac. Ai Weiwei's work extends beyond the visual statement and reaches into history. These sculptures were based on the zodiac heads originally located at the Imperial retreat Yuanming Yuan (Old Summer Palace) just outside of Beijing, where they adorned the famed fountain-clock. The original heads were made by Giuseppe Castiglione (1688-1766), an Italian Jesuit who executed a number of commissions for the Chinese emperor in the 18th century.

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Only a quarter of Britons believe that the Elgin Marbles, the ancient sculptures that once decorated the Parthenon temple in Athens, should remain in London's British Museum, according to a poll published Tuesday.

Half of the respondents to the YouGov survey published in the "Times" said the artifacts, also known as the Parthenon Marbles, should be returned to Greece, with a quarter undecided.

But a slim majority backed the museum's controversial decision to loan the works, which were taken from the Parthenon by British diplomat Lord Elgin in 1803, to Russia's State Hermitage Museum.

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After 13 years, a case centering on the status of a group of sculptures by Rodin has been dismissed by a French court. The Paris court ruled that, because the sculptures were not cast or sold in France, the case does not come under French jurisdiction.

Rodin donated most of the work he held to France in 1916, but a number of plasters were not included. Many years later, some of these were acquired by Gary Snell, a US businessman. Working with another firm, Gruppo Mondiale, Snell arranged the casting of a number of major sculptures in bronze from these plasters.

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Guess what? If you walk into the Doris C. Freedman Plaza, at the southeast entrance of Central Park, you will encounter something unusual, even strange: four huge sculptures by internationally famed Chinese sculptor Sui Jianguo.

It is the first time a Chinese artist's work occupies this plaza, which is named for the founder of the Public Art Fund.

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The stories behind some of London’s most radical public sculptures are traced in a display drawing on the Henry Moore Institute’s rich collection of sculptors’ papers in Leeds, England. The exhibition sheds new light on sculpture in the capital, charting the creative process, political debates and critical responses surrounding realized and unrealized works from the early twentieth century onwards.

Highlights include Laurence Bradshaw’s (1899-1978) iconic Karl Marx Memorial (1956) which stands in Highgate Cemetery in north London. A pilgrimage site for international socialist leaders and politicians over the past 50 years, the monument has also been a target for attacks and demonstrations, including damage from homemade bomb explosions in the 1970s.

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