News Articles Library Event Photos Contact Search


Displaying items by tag: vincent van gogh

The Henry and Rose Pearlman Foundation, owner of 72 works of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art, has launched a website (www.pearlmancollection.org) to make its collection readily available to the public. The site allows visitors to explore individual artists and works, create their own galleries from the collection, and to save those galleries privately or share them socially.

At the core of the Pearlman Collection are 33 works by Paul Cézanne including 16 watercolors that are rarely exhibited because of their sensitivity to light. The collection also includes works by Vincent Van Gogh, Amedeo Modigliani, Chaim Soutine, Paul Gauguin, Edouard Manet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Edgar Degas.

Henry Pearlman, the founder of Eastern Cold Storage, collected from the mid-1940s up until his death in 1975. The Henry and Rose Pearlman Collection is on long-term loan to The Princeton University Art Museum, where many of the major works are on display. A five-city tour of the collection’s masterpieces – organized in conjunction with Princeton – is planned for 2014-15. While individual works are often loaned to special exhibitions around the world, the collection has not been seen outside of the New York area for more than 35 years.

Published in News

Switzerland paid $1.6 million in legal fees despite winning a U.S. lawsuit over a drawing by Vincent van Gogh, which was donated by a businessman accused of exploiting the work’s former owner. The heir of Margaret Mauthner, a Jewish art collector who sold the drawing to Swiss businessman Oskar Reinhart in 1933 before fleeing Nazi Germany, brought the case against Switzerland in 2009.

The heir claimed that Reinhart, who gave the drawing Street in Saintes-Maries to Switzerland, had taken advantage of her grandmother’s unfortunate circumstance and forced her to sell the work for an unfair price. Switzerland maintained that Reinhart had paid a reasonable price for the drawing and ultimately won the case.

The work, which is valued at several million dollars, is currently on view in the Reinhart collection at the Winterthur Museum in northeastern Switzerland.

Published in News
Monday, 14 October 2013 12:50

Currier Museum Loaned European Masterpieces

The Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, NH has been loaned two significant impressionist landscape paintings – one by Vincent van Gogh and another by Pierre-August Renoir. The works will be on view at the museum through the end of January.

The van Gogh painting was created in 1887 and features a peasant in a field near a country road, with Paris off in the distance. The painting illustrates how contemporary impressionist and neo-impressionist artists living in Paris affected van Gogh’s work. The Renoir painting shows a woman holding a parasol and a bouquet of flowers, with another behind her, emerging from the trees. Although there are figures in the painting, the composition is highly influenced by the landscape.

The two masterpieces will be exhibited alongside Claude Monet’s The Seine at Bougival, which is a part of the Currier’s collection.

Published in News

Sunset at Montmajour, a recently discovered painting by Vincent van Gogh, is officially on public view at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. Axel Ruger, the museum’s director, said, “We are pleased to be able to show this exceptional painting to our visitors, because a new discovery of this magnitude has never before occurred in the history of the Van Gogh Museum.” The work will be on view through January 12, 2014 as part of the exhibition Van Gogh at Work, which shows how in ten years’ time van Gogh developed into a unique artist with an impressive oeuvre.

On September 9, 2013 officials at the Van Gogh Museum announced that after extensive research, they were confident that Sunset at Montmajour was an authentic work by van Gogh. The canvas, which depicts a dry landscape in Van Gogh’s characteristically thick brushstrokes, had been stored for decades in the attic of a Norwegian home before becoming a research subject at the Van Gogh Museum. Scholars were able to trace the earliest history of the provenance of the painting while Oda Van Maanen, the museum’s restorer, used x-ray photos and computer analyses to determine the type of canvas and pigments used, which were consistent with the materials regularly used by Van Gogh. Museum officials had previously deemed Sunset at Montmajour as inauthentic because the artist had not signed it.

Along with Sunset at Montmajour, Van Gogh at Work includes some of the artist’s best-known works including Sunflowers and The Bedroom.

Published in News

On Monday, September 9, 2013, the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam announced that after extensive research, they were confident that the painting Sunset at Montmajour was an authentic work by Vincent Van Gogh. Alex Ruger, the museum’s director, said, “A discovery of this magnitude has never before occurred in the history of the Van Gogh Museum. It is already a rarity that a new painting can be added to Van Gogh’s oeuvre. But what makes this even more exceptional is that this is a transition work in his oeuvre, and moreover, a large painting from a period that is considered by many to be the culmination of his artistic achievement, his period in Arles in south of France.” Sunset at Montmajour was painted in 1888 around the same time as Van Gogh’s seminal works Sunflowers, The Yellow House and The Bedroom.

The canvas, which depicts a dry landscape in Van Gogh’s characteristically thick brushstrokes, had been stored for decades in the attic of a Norwegian home before becoming a research subject at the Van Gogh Museum. Scholars were able to trace the earliest history of the provenance of the painting while Oda Van Maanen, the museum’s restorer, used x-ray photos and computer analyses to determine the type of canvas and pigments used, which were consistent with the materials regularly used by Van Gogh. Museum officials had previously deemed Sunset at Montmajour as inauthentic because the artist had not signed it.

Sunset at Montmajour will be on view at the Van Gogh Museum starting September 24, 2013 as part of the exhibition Van Gogh at Work.

Published in News

A rare early color image of Vincent Van Gogh’s Six Sunflowers was recently located in Japan and reveals that Van Gogh had created a bold orange frame for the still life. The original framed painting, which was part of a private Japanese collection, was destroyed in an American bombing raid during World War II.

The image is part of an extremely rare portfolio produced in Tokyo in 1921 and has been reproduced in The Sunflowers are Mine: The Story of Van Gogh’s Masterpiece by the Van Gogh expert, Martin Bailey. The image is significant because it reveals that Van Gogh had intended to present his Six Sunflowers in a dramatic way – the bright orange sharply contrasting with the painting’s blue background. This framing technique would have been revolutionary in 1888 as pictures were traditionally hung in gilt frames or in the case of very modern works, white frames.

Van Gogh painted four pictures of sunflowers in 1888 with three, six, fourteen and fifteen blooms. The last two paintings are among some of the best-known artworks in the world and are housed in Munich’s Neue Pinakothek and London’s National Gallery, respectively. Three Sunflowers is currently part of a private collection and has not been exhibited in living memory.

Published in News

The Denver Art Museum and the Clyfford Still Museum will present Picasso to Pollock: Modern Masterworks from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery from March 2, 2014 through June 8, 2014. The sprawling exhibition will bring together approximately 50 works by more than 40 significant artists from the late 19th century to the present. The show is drawn from the holdings of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, which boasts one of the finest collections of 20th century art in the country.

Modern Masterworks will present works by Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keeffe, Salvador Dali, Frida Kahlo, Andy Warhol and Jackson Pollock. The exhibition charts the evolution of modern art, starting with post-Impressionism and moving on to a number of groundbreaking movements such as Cubism, Surrealism, Pop Art and Minimalism. A large portion of Modern Masterworks is comprised of works by mid-century American artists such as Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning and Robert Motherwell.

A related exhibition, 1959, will be on view at the Clyfford Still Museum from February 14, 2014 through June 15, 2014. The show re-creates Still’s seminal exhibition held at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in 1959. Still, one of the leading figures of Abstract Expressionism was a contemporary of Pollock, de Kooning, Motherwell and Rothko.

Christoph Heinrich, Frederick and Jan Mayer Director of the Denver Art Museum, said, “Not only are most of the iconic artists of the time represented, but the works themselves are masterpieces from each artist.”

Published in News

A Danish phD thesis revealed that a common preservation method may cause more harm than good to artworks. The study showed that when an oil painting treated with the once-popular wax-resin lining is exposed to relative humidity over 60 percent there is a good chance that it will shrink, compressing the paint and causing it to flake off. The revelation was part of Cecil Krarup Andersen’s thesis, which was recently defended at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Conservation.

During the 20th century the “lining” technique was popular among conservators and used to protect well-known masterpieces including works by Rembrandt and Vincent van Gogh while traveling for loan exhibitions. For her thesis Lined canvas paintings: Mechanical properties and structural response to fluctuating relative humidity, Andersen studied the Danish national gallery's collection of Danish Golden Age paintings and examined the difference in moisture sensibility before and after wax-resin lining.

The wax-resin technique became popular during the 1960s but was obsolete by the 1970s since the method tended to darken paintings’ colors. However, the discovery of relative humidity’s effect on wax-resin lined canvases is a new finding. While the majority of museums maintain an approximate relative humidity of 50 percent, malfunctioning climate controls and flooding could leave some of the finest works in the canon of art in perilous danger.

Published in News

Christie’s announced that it will hold its first ever sale in India during December of this year in order to tap into the country’s burgeoning art scene. The London-based auction house has had an office in Mumbai for the past 20 years.

The upcoming sale will include domestic artwork and according to Christie’s chief executive, Steven Murphy,” will reflect “the increased international appeal of Indian art and the growing participation of Indian collectors across international sale categories.” The sale will be the first of its kind by an international auction house in India.

Interest in western art has increased in India over the past decade thanks in part to the country’s substantial economic growth. The first auction of international masterpieces in India took place last year in New Delhi and included works by Vincent van Gogh and Pablo Picasso. The demand for Indian artworks outside of India continues to grow. In 2010, a painting by Indian artist Syed Haider Raza sold for nearly $3.6 billion at Christie’s London, setting the record for a modern Indian work.  

Published in News

Boston-based collector, Dorothy Braude Edinburg, has gifted nearly 1,000 works of art to the Art Institute of Chicago, making it one of the most significant donations in the museum’s history. The gift includes approximately 800 works on paper – primarily European prints and drawings from Old Mast to modern – and 150 works of Asian art. The donation will complement the considerable long-term loans and prior gifts made by Edinburg including works by Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) and Henri Matisse (1869-1954).

The most recent gift, along with Edinburg’s previous donations, is part of the Harry B. and Bessie K. Braude Memorial Collection, which honors Edinburg’s parents. Highlights include nearly 50 extremely rare Japanese volumes, many of which are from the Edo period, a sorely unrepresented period in American museum collections; Chinese celadons from the 12th and 13th centuries; and prints and drawings by Edgar Degas (1834-1917), Claude Monet (1840-1926), Edvard Munch (1863-1944) and James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903), among many others.

Edinburg said, “I have never thought of my collection as a personal endeavor. I have always believed that it should ultimately enter a major museum and serve a broad public…I have seen the Art Institute as the eventual home for my entire collection for many years, and I am thrilled to taking another step forward with this gift in honor of my parents.”        

Published in News
Page 7 of 9
Events