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A suburban Kansas City school district has found a new home for a Thomas Hart Benton painting that it was keeping locked up because it was considered too valuable to display at a school.

The painting "Utah Highlands" will be on long-term loan at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, starting in late April, the school and museum announced this past week.

The Shawnee Mission School District had kept the painting in a vault for safekeeping after it was appraised at $700,000. Students who donated the painting in 1957 as a class gift began asking where the painting was after The Kansas City Star reported earlier this year that it was no longer being displayed.

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The Williams College Museum of Art has received a donation of 68 works of contemporary art from the collection of computer programmer and philanthropist Peter Norton.

WCMA is one recipient in a series of gifts to university and college art museums throughout the country. The art, from Norton’s personal collection, is intended to support the integration of the visual arts in higher education, to connect diverse audiences with contemporary art, and to foster creative museum practice.

The gift to WCMA is part of Norton’s second such philanthropic project, following one in 2000 in which he gave more than 1,000 pieces to 32 institutions.

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The great spectrum of some of the Palm Springs Art Museum's most treasured artworks from the 20th century are now on display in the museum's newly named Joseph Clayes III Exhibition Wing.

Works by masters such as Willem de Kooning, Henry Moore, Marc Chagall and others are on display in the museum's Clayes Exhibition Wing, made possible through a $1 million donation from the Joseph Clayes Charitable Trust. This wing, located near the front of the building on the north side, was formerly the McCallum Wing.

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Selections from the George Stephanopoulos Collection presents the works of artists who happen to be important photographers. The photographic prints in the exhibition are a sampling of over 120 works recently donated to The Hyde Collection by television journalist George Stephanopoulos and his family.

Photographs by Henri Cartier-Bresson, French (1908-2004); Williams E. Dassonville, American (1879-157); Mike Disfarmer, American (1884-1959); Larry Fink, American (b. 1941); Mario Finocchiaro, Italian (1920-1999); Leonard Freed, American (1929-2006); Yousuf Karsh, Canadian, (1908-2002); Jeannette Klute, American (1929-2009); Leon Levinstein, American (1920-1988); Joel Meyerowitz, American (b. 1938); Michael A. Smith, American (b.1942), and Karl Struss, American (1886-1981) are in the exhibition.

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With a $200,000 donation, the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation will be the lead foundation donor for the US pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale.

Last week, curator Okwui Enwezor announced the 136 artists and collectives included in the “All the World's Futures," the Biennale's main exhibition.

The gift was announced by the MIT List Visual Arts Center, the organizer of the US pavilion, which will feature an immersive multimedia installation from veteran video and performance artist Joan Jonas, inspired by the work of writer Halldór Laxness as well as other literary sources.

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The Cleveland Museum of Art announced a $19 million campaign challenge gift from trustee and Dealer Tire CEO Scott Mueller, which nearly completes the institution's decade-long capital fundraising effort. When combined with Mueller's initial campaign commitment of $1 million, three $1 million restricted gifts, and his annual contributions, at more than $23 million, he ranks among the top donors in the museum's history.  

"Mr. Mueller's historic commitment represents the capstone of our capital campaign. We are simply in awe of his generosity and believe that these gifts further establish his standing among Cleveland's storied philanthropists," said Cleveland Museum of Art director William Griswold. "Mr. Mueller's giving has impacted so many dimensions of the museum's work and reinforces everything we're trying to accomplish."

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More than 200 prints by the American pop artist Jim Dine, featuring imagery including paintbrushes, bathrobes, tools and hearts, have been gifted to the British Museum.

The collection was the largest gift made to the museum’s prints and drawings department in 2014.

“It is very exciting,” said the museum’s curator of modern prints, Stephen Coppel, who was allowed to select from Dine’s entire oeuvre, starting in the 1960s.

“It was a very generous offer, given that he has made over a thousand prints,” said Coppel. “Choosing was fun. It took some time and there was a lot of backing and forthing, but it is a really great group of things.”

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The Ryerson Image Center is the recipient of an archive of nearly 13,000 photographs and negatives by the acclaimed 20th century photographer Berenice Abbott.

The archive, a donation from a group of anonymous donors, represents the largest and most comprehensive collection of Abbott’s work in the world.

Abbott, who died in 1991, was best known for her project "Changing New York," in which she doggedly documented the transition of New York City during the Great Depression and the years leading up to the war. Her project, financed by Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Federal Art Project, has become perhaps the definitive document of the city’s transition to modernity.

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Artists Jeff Koons and Cindy Sherman have donated to the Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies’s Original Print and Photography Collections, respectively.

The FAPE’s collections are displayed in U.S. embassies all over the world, and aim to promote the creativity and diversity of American culture. The tradition of artists donating artworks to the FAPE’s Original Print and Photography Collections began in 1989, when Frank Stella donated an edition of "The Symphony" to every American embassy, and every year, an American artist has donated a new edition of original prints.

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The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston is receiving a major gift of 186 works seized by Nazi forces in 1938.

It’s taken decades for the donor’s family to recover the famed collection that includes fine jewelry, rare books and paintings. The objects have taken a fascinating journey between Vienna and Boston.

One of the confiscated works is a Dutch painting of a man on a horse titled, “A Dordrecht nobleman on horseback with retainers and grooms.” But instead of focusing on the front of the canvas, MFA curator of provenance Victoria Reed points to numbers and letters on the back. They’ve been drawn, etched and stamped onto the painting’s wooden stretcher.

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